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Research Letter
March 2017

Quality of Abstracts Reporting Randomized Clinical Trials Presented at a Major Oncology Conference

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Canton, Guangdong, China
  • 2Clinical Trials Center, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Canton, Guangdong, China
  • 3Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
JAMA Oncol. 2017;3(3):414-416. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.4899

A substantial proportion of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) initially presented in conference proceedings are not published as full articles afterward.1,2 For example, a survey of 510 large phase 3 RCTs presented at American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meetings over 10 years found that 26% of them were not published.1 Thus, a meeting abstract may provide the only permanent information about an RCT that had been executed. The 2008 Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) for Abstracts defined a minimum list of essential items to include when reporting RCTs in abstracts.3 Herein, we assess the quality of ASCO abstracts of RCTs based on the CONSORT guidelines.

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