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Invited Commentary
June 2017

Patient Navigation—An Effective Strategy to Reduce Health Care Costs and Improve Health Outcomes

Author Affiliations
  • 1Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • 2Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • 3Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • 4Division of Medical Dietetics and Health Sciences, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • 5Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus
JAMA Oncol. 2017;3(6):825-826. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.6107

Patient navigation (PN) was formally defined by Freeman in 1990 in response to high breast cancer mortality rates observed among African American women in Harlem, New York.1 It is designed to help patients complete recommended tests, appointments, and treatments by identifying and resolving barriers to care.1 The single-site observational data by Freeman showed the influence of PN on breast cancer mortality rates1; however, randomized trials were needed to truly validate PN.

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