Prevalence of Nonrecommended Screening for Prostate Cancer and Breast Cancer in the United States: A Nationwide Survey Analysis | Breast Cancer | JAMA Oncology | JAMA Network
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Research Letter
April 2016

Prevalence of Nonrecommended Screening for Prostate Cancer and Breast Cancer in the United States: A Nationwide Survey Analysis

Author Affiliations
  • 1Center for Outcomes Research, Analytics and Evaluation, Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan
  • 2Division of Urologic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 3Center for Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 4Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
JAMA Oncol. 2016;2(4):543-545. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.5871

Existing guidelines acknowledge the risks of overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with early detection of prostate cancer and breast cancer and recommend against screening for these tumors in individuals with limited life expectancy.1,2 The cost to the US health care system related to overdiagnosis may be as high as $1.2 billion annually.3 That finding, combined with the aging population and an expected surge of older individuals with prostate cancer and breast cancer in upcoming years,4 indicates that a contemporary nationwide and state-by-state assessment of the prevalence of nonrecommended screening for prostate cancer and breast cancer is essential and timely.

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