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Ophthalmic Images
April 11, 2019

Tubercular Retinal Vasculitis

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry, the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • 3Shanghai Key Laboratory of Visual Impairment and Restoration, the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019;137(4):e184499. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.4499

A 25-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of bilateral blurry vision. His best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 OD and 20/40 OS. An ophthalmoscopic examination showed multifocal areas of presumed inflammatory lesions along the retinal veins in both eyes, along with retinal neovascularization elsewhere in the left eye from the 12-o’clock position to the 1-o’clock position, just anterior to the posterior pole. Widefield fluorescein angiography revealed segmental retinal vascular leakage (Figure, A) in the right eye and capillary nonperfusion with neovascularization (Figure, B) in the left eye. Both a purified protein derivative test and interferon-γ release assay were positive. A diagnosis of presumed tubercular retinal vasculitis was made.

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