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In This Issue of JAMA Ophthalmology
September 2019

Highlights

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019;137(9):963. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.4788
Research

Brandão-de-Resende and coauthors conduct a cross-sectional study of patients who had received a confirmed diagnosis of yellow fever during 2 recent outbreaks in Southeastern Brazil. Of 64 patients, 13 (20%) had retinopathy, with the most common retinal findings being retinal nerve fiber layer infarct, superficial hemorrhage, and grayish outer retinal lesions. Retinopathy can be observed among patients with yellow fever but may be overlooked, especially if more severe disease precludes careful ophthalmoscopic examinations.

Invited Commentary

Author Audio Interview

Gong and coauthors evaluate differences in cataract surgery and total procedural volume between US male and female residents during ophthalmology residency training. The analysis of case logs of 1271 ophthalmology residents from 24 US ophthalmology residency programs estimated that female residents performed 7.8 to 22.2 fewer cataract operations and 36.0 to 80.2 fewer total procedures compared with their male counterparts from 2005 to 2017. The gap widened during this period for total procedural volume. The results suggest that the current state of surgical training in ophthalmology residency programs deserves further study to ensure that male and female residents have equivalent training experiences.

Invited Commentary

Journal Club

Gupta and coauthors determine if a quantitative measurement of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) severity can be used over time to monitor disease regression after treatment. In a cohort study of at-risk infants using data collected for the Imaging and Informatics in Retinopathy of Prematurity study, the quantitative ROP vascular severity score developed using an automated deep learning–based plus disease classifier consistently reflected clinical disease posttreatment regression in 46 included eyes with laser or bevacizumab treatment. The results show that tracking quantitative measurements of ROP severity may be an effective method of following disease regression and identifying patients at risk for recurrence after ROP treatment.

Invited Commentary

Continuing Medical Education

Corwin and colleagues evaluate the association of preoperative disclosure of resident roles with patient consent rates for cataract surgery and investigate the patient’s subjective experience of this process. In a cohort study, about half of community-based patients would consent to resident involvement in cataract surgery, with no associations between baseline characteristics and consent. Thematic categories suggested to have been associated with giving or declining consent included trust in the attending surgeon, contributing to training of future surgeons, and supervision. These findings suggest approximately half of community private practice patients may consent to resident surgery following preoperative disclosure.

Invited Commentary

Author Audio Interview

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