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Invited Commentary
September 10, 2020

Is Binocular Interference a Distinct Clinical Entity?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
JAMA Ophthalmol. Published online September 10, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2020.3337

Clinicians who treat strabismus are cognizant of the tendency to close 1 eye that some patients display when performing complex or detailed visual tasks. Although the eye closure is frequently attributed to an attempt to alleviate binocular diplopia, it may occur even in the absence of double vision. A plausible explanation for this tendency in patients without diplopia is subnormal binocular summation or binocular inhibition.1 Scarce information is available regarding eye closure in ophthalmic conditions other than strabismus.

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