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Article
April 1929

OCULAR RESIDUA AND SEQUELAE OF EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS

Author Affiliations
PHILADELPHIA
Arch Ophthalmol. 1929;1(4):501-506. doi:10.1001/archopht.1929.00810010519009
Abstract

A little over ten years ago the great influenza epidemic raged over the entire world. About the same time in Europe, and shortly thereafter in America, another fearful scourge, epidemic encephalitis, made its appearance, and, in sporadic form, still exists. While not as deadly in its immediate results as was the influenza epidemic, it is perhaps equally as tragic when the thousands of mentally and physically incapacitated survivors of the disease are taken into consideration. According to Parsons,1 about 40 per cent become disabled, "as it appears from the after-histories of some 3,000 patients."

That ocular disturbances play a prominent rôle in the symptomatology of the early stages of this disease is well known. Such eye symptoms as diplopia and paresis of accommodation are often among the earliest manifestations. In most instances, fortunately, they are transitory and disappear in a few days or weeks. In many

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