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Article
August 1929

AN OPTICAL REPLICA OF THE HUMAN EYE FOR THE STUDY OF THE RETINAL IMAGE

Author Affiliations

HANOVER, N. H.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1929;2(2):138-163. doi:10.1001/archopht.1929.00810020145003
Abstract

For a number of years, Prof. Adelbert Ames, Jr., of Dartmouth College, has been interested in the problem of ascertaining the nature of the retinal image in the human eye. His method of approaching this problem was to measure the aberrations in his own eyes, to study their effects as he interpreted them and so to analyze the nature of his subjective impressions.1 For this study, I attempted to design for him a photographic lens which had the same aberrations as were present in his eye, according to his subjective measurements.2 With a lens of this kind it was possible to approximate the chromatic aberration, spherical aberration, astigmatism and distortion of his right eye. The design, however, was for a flat focal plane and the effects were different from those found in the eye, for the retina, which is really the focal plane of the eye, is

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