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Article
February 1930

TATTOOING OF THE CORNEA WITH GOLD AND PLATINUM CHLORIDE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Division of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;3(2):176-181. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810040054005
Abstract

Tattooing of the cornea is an old subject and as its history is well known, I will not go into details. Galen, in the second century after Christ, mentions tattooing of the cornea by means of copper sulphate, reduced with nutgall in the powdered form. DeWecker, in 1870, reintroduced it in its modern form, using india ink introduced into the cornea through mechanical means. Since then many other substances, including lamp black, candle black and many colored pigments, have been tried. Holth,1 in an article published in 1926, gives an excellent report of the necessary technic and also gives glowing accounts of the results of his work with this method. In the hands of a master, such as Holth, this may be possible, but for the average man such achievements are out of the question. I believe I would be stating the truth if I said that most

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