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Article
March 1930

THE EXTENT OF THE FIELD OF VISION IN LENS MICROPSIA

Author Affiliations

LOUISVILLE, KY.
From the Department of Psychology, University of Louisville.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;3(3):331-334. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810050083008
Abstract

The most commonly observed effect of micropsia is the apparent reduction in the size of visual objects. Aside from the spontaneous appearance of micropsia in pathologic states, such as disseminated choroiditis and primary retinitis,1 it can be artificially produced by any means which interfere with the normal correspondence of convergence with accommodation. Thus micropsia can be induced by the use of mydriatics,2 which paralyze the accommodation to a greater or lesser degree; the Hering haploscope; the mirror stereoscope, and prisms.3 Concave lenses, which in respect to the induction of micropsia belong with the other instruments named, lend themselves to a simple and easy procedure and involve none of the discomforts that accompany the use of mydriatics. It is for these reasons, and perhaps because with a lens before the eye the point of fixation may be at any distance in a room and not limited within the

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