[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1930

THE PATHOGENESIS OF ACUTE GLAUCOMA: II. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute of the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;3(5):574-582. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810070080004
Abstract

In the preceding paper evidence was presented that a lesion of the capillaries in the ciliary body and processes with resultant edema and serous, hemorrhagic and fibrinous exudations occurs constantly in acute glaucoma. The question was then raised as to which of the signs and symptoms of acute glaucoma are to be attributed directly to this lesion. The experimental procedure that was adopted to elucidate this point consisted in the injection into the eye of solutions of histamine (ergamine acid phosphate). This substance is known to be a capillary poison, causing paralysis of the capillary walls and an increased permeability of the endothelium. Solutions of varying concentration were injected in varying amounts into the anterior chamber, vitreous and ciliary body of animals of different species (dogs, cats, rabbits and monkeys). We shall present first the results of the histologic examination of these eyes, especially those in which histamine

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×