[Skip to Navigation]
Article
June 1930

CAUSES OF FAILURE IN OPHTHALMIC OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;3(6):695-703. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810080041003
Abstract

Obviously the cause of failure in any surgical operation is the exercise of poor judgment. In a certain percentage of cases this may result in erroneous diagnosis. Again, failure may originate from the improper selection of the operative procedure, or the application of a procedure much too vigorous for the particular patient. In another group of cases the failure may be closely associated with the surgeon's inability to exercise his best surgical sense in the various eventualities that may arise in a complicated case.

It is essential, therefore, that the student of ophthalmology who is doing postgraduate work should have the counsel and results of a surgeon of experience as a guide, so that he may avoid pitfalls that have been found to have a remedy. It is not sufficient that he witness display of skill, and marvel at the dexterity of some master, since ambition to imitate

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×