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Article
August 1930

UNRECOGNIZED MAGNETIC INTRA-OCULAR FOREIGN BODIES AND THEIR LEGAL ASPECTS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;4(2):194-204. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810100040005
Abstract

Two recent legal decisions relative to unrecognized magnetic intraocular foreign bodies clearly define the degree to which improvement in medical knowledge and skill creates a corresponding responsibility and legal liability.

In the case of Kosal v. Boyce, 201 N. W. 757, decided by the Supreme Court of Wisconsin in 1925,1 the plaintiff-patient was struck in the eye by part of a steel spring. The defendant-physician, who specialized in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, treated the injury. According to the record, this physician examined the eye by the use of the ophthalmoscope, direct illumination and oblique focal rays, but failed to discover any foreign body in the eye. Several months later another physician, with the aid of roentgenograms, discovered a piece of steel in the eye. The plaintiff brought suit, and the lower court awarded him damages to the extent of $2,000. The Supreme Court of

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