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Article
August 1930

VERNAL CATARRHREPORT OF A CASE TREATED BY RADIUM

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;4(2):205-207. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810100051006
Abstract

History.—G. S., a boy, aged 12, reported at the eye dispensary at the Presbyterian Hospital in May, 1929, giving a history that two years previously his eyes had become irritated, with sufficient secretion to glue the lids in the mornings and with some lacrimation. He had had some hospital treatment but without improvement.

The vision was 6/12 in the right eye and 6/9 in the left. The tarsal conjunctiva was roughened, and in the upper lid there were large granulations typical of vernal catarrh. They were so large that pressure had flattened them out, giving them the appearance of a tessellated pavement; there was also some involvement of the pericorneal tissues, and the conjunctiva had a milky appearance.

Treatment.—Dr. H. B. Wilmer was asked to see him to make the allergic test, and the patient was found to react positively to dandelion and timothy, but

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