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Article
October 1930

THE RELATION OF TEETH TO DISEASES OF THE EYE

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute of the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;4(4):453-467. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810120011001
Abstract

Odontology is of ancient lineage. Fifteen hundred years before Christ, diseases of the teeth were mentioned in Eber's papyrus. Among the early Egyptians, dentists were numerous, for Herodotus says :

Physicke is so studied and practiced with the Egyptiens that every disease hath his several physicians, who striveth to excel in healing that one disease and not to be expert in curing many. Whereof it cometh that every corner of the country is full of physicians. Some for the eyes, others for the head, many for the teeth, not a few for the stomach and the inwards.

The Etruscans, according to Garrison,1 were highly skilled in dentistry, and he quoted Martial in regard to the excellence of their bridgework.

Early in the Christian era, the teeth had their own patron saint, Saint Apollonia, who was a protectress not only of those who suffered from toothache but also of

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