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Article
October 1930

LATE POSTOPERATIVE SEPARATION OF THE CHOROID

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;4(4):530-532. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810120090009
Abstract

Postoperative separation of the choroid was thought to be rare until Fuchs, in 1900, showed that it was a comparatively common occurrence. In the first series of cases that he published one case appears in which the separation did not take place until four months after operation. Fuchs rightly advanced the view that such an observation belonged among the great rarities of ophthalmology. Time has proved the correctness of his judgment, since even up to the present day few of these cases appear in the literature. For that reason the following case seems worthy of record.

REPORT OF CASE

W. L. R., a teacher, aged 55, a patient of Dr. Alexander Quackenboss, developed chronic simple glaucoma in 1928, and was referred to me for operation. Central vision was normal in each eye. Both fields showed a nasal step connecting with an arcuate scotoma from the blind spot. There was early

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