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Article
November 1930

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SOME CHANGES IN THE VESSELS OF THE FUNDUS

Author Affiliations

ALBANY, N. Y.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;4(5):695-719. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810130085008
Abstract

So much is heard about arteriosclerosis and high blood pressure that this study was undertaken to see whether it was possible to draw definite conclusions concerning these symptoms from an inspection of the eyegrounds and a critical analysis of a large number of photographs.

There are all grades of physiologic vascularization of the fundus. The course of the vessels presents unlimited variations not only in the number, position and size of the major subdivisions, but also in their course and contour. The vessels of some fundi are almost straight, and in others twisted convolutions like a medusan head cover the field. An essential characteristic of a normal vessel is that its caliber is unchanged at vein and artery crossing.

As most physicians know and as all ophthalmologists appreciate, the fundus is the scenic background on which is thrown life in its various phases of vascular change. By means of the

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