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Article
November 1930

SMALL TUMOR OF THE IRIS WHICH CAUSED SECONDARY GLAUCOMA: RELATION OF MELANOMA TO SARCOMA OF THE IRIS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;4(5):720-726. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810130110009
Abstract

W. L., a man, aged 30, seen on Feb. 24, 1928, stated that the sight in the right eye had become affected six weeks before, and that the eye had felt uncomfortable. Vision with the correcting glass (—0.5 sphere, —0.5 cylinder, axis 45 degrees) was 6/9. The anterior chamber was deep. The pupil measured 8 mm. and was immobile. Tension, as measured by Schiötz' tonometer, was 42. The field was concentrically contracted. The optic nerve showed a deep cup. The iris was blue, except for a sector between 3 and 5 o'clock, which was brown. This sector was perfectly flat, though suggesting some thickening at the periphery. Though one eye had always been darker than the other, the patient's mother had noticed the spot only nine years before. The left eye was normal.

The most careful examination of the iris did not confirm the presence of a tumor that might

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