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Article
June 1931

THE BEHAVIOR OF THE VITREOUS UNDER DIFFERENT HYDROGEN AND HYDROXYL ION CONCENTRATIONS: A STUDY IN VITRO

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Iowa.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1931;5(6):903-917. doi:10.1001/archopht.1931.00820060071007
Abstract

Many investigators have reported changes in intra-ocular pressure when the eye, in vitro or in vivo, was subjected to treatment with acids or alkalis. Fischer1 instituted such investigations. He used whole eyes of sheep, oxen and pigs from which the connective tissue and the muscles had been removed. After the eyes had been weighed, they were kept in acid solutions of different strengths. At certain intervals they were removed from their respective solutions, dried with filter paper and weighed again. Increase in weight showed the extent of swelling, which was found to be proportional to the time of immersion and the strength of the acid. The greater the concentration of the acid, the greater was the swelling, and if the eyes were kept long enough in the acid solutions, they invariably came to the bursting point. Fischer observed also that the eyes swelled in pure water, but to a

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