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Article
November 1931

THE NORMAL VITREOUS HUMOR: A CRITICAL STUDY

Arch Ophthalmol. 1931;6(5):754-765. doi:10.1001/archopht.1931.00820070783011
Abstract

A great deal has been written about the vitreous humor, but its true normal structure and composition are still unknown. The introduction of improved methods of focal illumination for the study of the vitreous body in situ and the results obtained by workers in other fields on the fluids of the body—the blood, aqueous humor and cerebrospinal fluid— have spurred the ophthalmologist to investigate the nature of the structure of the vitreous body.

ANATOMY

Long before Galen's time, the vitreous was considered as a humor that gave the eyeball its shape, but it was Galen who described it as a substance that was thicker and clearer than blood, had the appearance of molten glass and was colorless. There was less moisture in the crystalline humor than in the vitreous. The crystalline humor was derived from the vitreous, which in turn came from the structure surrounding it, and the

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