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Article
December 1931

POSTOPERATIVE NONEXPULSIVE SUBCHOROIDAL HEMORRHAGE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1931;6(6):840-851. doi:10.1001/archopht.1931.00820070871003
Abstract

Bleeding under the choroid may occur in connection with injuries, operations or perforating ulcers of the cornea. This contribution is restricted to cases in which operation has been performed and in which the hemorrhage has remained confined to the perichoroidal space. In the so-called expulsive hemorrhage, the bleeding takes place with such force that the choroid is ruptured and the blood in flowing out of the opening in the globe carries with it most of the intra-ocular contents. In the form here considered, the choroid is not torn.

REPORT OF CASES

Case 1.—A woman, aged 65, had glaucoma. The cornea was steamy. The pupil was contracted by miotics to the size of a pinpoint. The anterior chamber was very shallow. Vision was 6/36. Iridectomy was performed. Immediately after the excision of the iris, lens matter presented in the wound, and the patient was seized with excruciating pain. The next day

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