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Article
January 1932

THE MILD FORM OF EPITHELIAL DYSTROPHY OF THE CORNEA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;7(1):18-30. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820080028002
Abstract

The picture of epithelial dystrophy as described by Fuchs1 is so characteristic that it could hardly fail to be recognized by any one having the condition in mind. Little has been added to his classic description of the condition given in 1910. In its essentials, the condition consists in an edema of the corneal epithelium with the formation of numerous blebs of varying size, associated with punctate grayish opacities in the epithelium and grayish lines and dots in the parenchyma. The condition begins insidiously, the only symptom being gradual diminution of vision, which was reduced to 6/60 or even counting fingers in most of Fuchs' cases. The sensation of the cornea is greatly diminished or absent, and Fuchs believed the cause of the condition to be a disturbance of nutrition affecting the superficial corneal nerves. All of his patients were over 48 years of age, and nine women

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