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Article
January 1932

SYMPATHETIC OPHTHALMIA FROM A NON-PERFORATING TRAUMA: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Oscar Johnson Institute, Washington University, St. Louis.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;7(1):97-100. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820080109006
Abstract

History.—A girl, aged 6 years, was brought for consultation to Dr. William E. Shahan on Feb. 11, 1928, about one hour after being struck in the right eye by a stick. Only several small abrasions on the right cornea were noted ; no deeper wound could be found. The lower part of the anterior chamber was occupied by blood. Hemorrhage completely filled the anterior chamber on the following day, and the intra-ocular tension, to the fingers, was elevated. On the first of April, there was perception of light in the right eye with apparently good projection. By April 21 (ten weeks after the injury), the uninjured fellow eye showed cloudiness of the aqueous and numerous posterior synechiae. On the same day the softened right eye was enucleated. In spite of the most intensive treatment with atropine-cocaine in oil, sodium salicylate, neoarsphenamine, diphtheria antitoxin and immunogen, the uveitis in

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