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Article
May 1932

SIZE AND SHAPE OF OCULAR IMAGES: II. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

Author Affiliations

HANOVER, N. H.
From the Department of Research in Physiological Optics, Dartmouth Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;7(5):720-738. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820120070004
Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The number of patients showing ocular symptoms and the many showing general symptoms of possible ocular origin that have received no relief from refractive treatment, nor even from some admirable mental therapy, form quite a group in the practice of every ophthalmologist. In a certain percentage of these cases a diagnosis of ocular neurosis can easily and correctly be made, but in many cases such a diagnosis does not meet the situation. This haven is often a greater source of contentment to the physician than to the patient. Ocular neurosis is an important factor, but one seems prone to place too large a number of cases in this convenient pigeonhole.

Two years before this writing our interest was aroused in the work of Professor Ames and his associates, and since that time we have endeavored to learn to what extent his investigations fit into the clinical picture. This

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