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Article
June 1932

UVEITIS WITH DYSACOUSIA, ALOPECIA AND POLIOSIS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;7(6):847-855. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820130031002
Abstract

It has been known for many years that in some cases of sympathetic ophthalmia changes of the hair and skin take place, owing to depigmentation. Nettleship,1 in 1884, recorded a case in which the eyelashes of the eye sympathetically affected were quite white. In this report he also mentioned a case reported by Hutchison, in which a severe plastic uveitis of nontraumatic origin was accompanied by changes in the eyelashes. He believed that this strengthened the argument that sympathetic inflammation was transmitted by the fifth nerve, or at least by the ciliary nerves. Similar cases of whitening of the cilia are reported by Schenkl,2 Jacobi,3 Bock4 and Tay.5 Cramer's6 case is of interest in that sympathetic ophthalmia followed the extraction of a luxated lens, and the first attack was accompanied by severe and permanent deafness ; during the second attack, occurring three months

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