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Article
July 1932

THE OPHTHALMOLOGIST AND THE LIGHTING PROBLEMS OF HIS PATIENTS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;8(1):1-8. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820140009001
Abstract

What knowledge of illumination may be expected of the ophthalmologist? Poor lighting may be divided, for the purposes of this paper, quite arbitrarily into two classes. In the first the lighting is so defective that no expert knowledge is required to condemn it. In the second group the lighting is defective, but its defects are not obvious ; and quite frequently the user of the light and the dealer who supplied the fixtures and the manufacturer who made them, and even a large corporation like the General Electric Company who advertises them may think the arrangement is good. Patients using such defective lighting often say that they have the best there is. It may fairly be expected of the ophthalmologist that he should be able to recognize defective lighting of the second type, since it is frequently a cause of his patient's symptoms. He should know enough about the

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