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Article
August 1932

WOUND CLOSURE FOR INTRACAPSULAR EXTRACTION OF CATARACT

Author Affiliations

MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;8(2):238-244. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820150090009
Abstract

Among the great advances made in ophthalmic surgery in the recent past must be listed the general acceptance of some form of suture for closing the incision made for the extraction of cataract. Of great assistance in capsulotomy procedures, suture becames an absolute necessity in closing the larger incision required for intracapsular methods.

Since the first attempt made by Williams1 in 1869 to suture a cataract incision, many methods of suturing have been advocated. These can be divided into several types as follows: (1) conjunctival, (2) corneal, (3) scleroconjunctival, (4) sclerocorneal and (5) sclerocorneal-conjunctival.

It is obvious that a purely conjunctival suture placed across the incision can give only partial security because of the elasticity of the conjunctiva and its friability, especially in the aged. A sliding flap of the Van Lint type anchored to the episcleral or outer scleral tissue is much more secure, but

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