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Article
August 1932

REFLECTING PRISM-LENS FOR SLIT-LAMP MICROSCOPY OF THE RETINA

Author Affiliations

Brooklyn
From the Research Department of the Brooklyn Eye and Ear Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;8(2):274-277. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820150126017
Abstract

Ophthalmologists have had a desire to study the retina by means of the slit-lamp and corneal microscope. They have come to realize that the use of the contact glass as an auxiliary for this purpose will not become popular.1

The following is the description of a simple and inexpensive attachment for the standard slit-lamp which apparently solves the problem.

A planoconvex condensing lens is mounted on a rod support, as indicated by the accompanying photographs. To one face of this lens and at its optical center a small right angle prism is mounted in such a way that a pencil of light entering one of its faces will be bent 45° (totally reflected) and will emerge coincident with the optical axis of the lens (fig. 1). The lens need not be corrected for spherical or chromatic aberration.

A small clamp is next secured (one of a standard

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