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Article
September 1932

RETINITIS PUNCTATA ALBESCENS: REPORT OF TWO CASES IN WHICH THE DOTS DISAPPEARED

Author Affiliations

WATERTOWN, N. Y.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;8(3):409-413. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820160103008
Abstract

Retinitis punctata albescens was first described by Mooren1 in 1882. The disease is allied to retinitis pigmentosa, and the name, according to Leber,2 indicates a type of depigmented tapetoretinal degeneration. Both eyes are affected.

There is often a history of consanguinity in families in which it is found, and several members of the family may be affected, which is significant on account of the rarity of this disease. No instances are reported in which it has been observed in more than one generation in any family. It has been observed rather frequently in families in which retinitis pigmentosa has occurred, although not necessarily in the same generation.

Both sexes are affected and there appears to be no racial predilection, as two cases were reported by Cohen3 in colored children.

Bell,4 in describing the condition, stated that night-blindness is almost invariably present from an early

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