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Article
November 1932

BACTERIOPHAGE IN OPHTHALMOLOGY: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Bellevue Hospital, and the Department of Pathology and Bacteriology, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;8(5):683-689. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820180055005
Abstract

Recently notable advances have been made in bacteriology and immunology which are of utmost importance and have changed the older concepts in regard to the growth and destruction of bacteria. These discoveries have a practical application in medicine and surgery, and an attempt is being made to apply some of these new principles to ophthalmology with the hope of providing some additional methods of treatment of ocular infections.

In 1915, Twort1 published a paper in which he made certain observations on a lytic agent. He noted that it acted only on living bacteria, was reproducible in series and would pass through the finest bacteriologic filter. He suggested several theories regarding its nature ; that it might be a living ultramicroscopic organism, a tiny ameba or an enzyme with the power of growth.

In 1916, d'Herelle2 made an interesting observation. He took a small amount of the stool from a

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