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Article
December 1932

RETINAL VASCULAR DISEASE IN A CASE OF ACUTE LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS DISSEMINATUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Laboratories and Ophthalmological Division of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;8(6):852-857. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820190072007
Abstract

The present case, in which atrophy of both optic nerves occurred in a case of acute lupus erythematosus disseminatus, is reported because it furnishes an instance of unique disease affecting the larger arterioles in the retina.

These lesions were found in the eyes of a young woman, in whom, following a recent illness suggesting acute rheumatic fever, there had appeared a group of bizarre symptoms, including skin lesions resembling those of acute lupus erythematosus disseminatus. No satisfactory diagnosis was arrived at. Among others, an atypical verrucose endocarditis (Libman and Sacks1), which is often accompanied by this type of skin lesion, was suggested. A biopsy specimen taken from one of the skin blotches was reported as containing capillary thrombi in the corium, and because of this, a diagnosis of generalized hyaline vascular thrombosis was also offered. Later review of this material failed to confirm this impression of the skin

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