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Article
June 1934

Determination of the Sensitiveness of the Eye to Differences in the Saturation of Colours.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1934;11(6):1089-1090. doi:10.1001/archopht.1934.00830130173021

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Abstract

This is the fourth report on the subject of color vision to be published by the Medical Research Council and is in direct succession to that by Dr. W. D. Wright entitled "A Redetermination of the Tri-Chromatic Mixture Data." The subject is treated largely from a theoretical standpoint.

The spectral colors are not of equal saturation, and it is doubtful whether any spectral color is completely saturated. This condition, like color itself, is a psychologic entity and cannot be measured directly.

The authors' experiments were limited to the recognition of the steps in saturation between two contiguous halves of a field of view, the total field subtending an angle of 2 degrees square, and the line of separation being horizontal. The point at which the least difference in saturation became just perceptible, the limen of purity, was investigated under various conditions. The apparatus used consisted substantially

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