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Article
February 1935

THE NEMATODE THELAZIA CALIFORNIENSIS AS A PARASITE OF THE EYE OF MAN IN CALIFORNIA

Author Affiliations
BERKELEY, CALIF.; STOCKTON, CALIF.From the Department of Zoology, University of California, and the Department of Biologic Sciences, College of the Pacific.
Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;13(2):176-180. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840020036002
Abstract

Nematodes of the genus Thelazia occur as natural parasites in the conjunctival sac and on the surface of the eyeball of certain mammals and birds in various parts of the world. Rarely, and probably abnormally, the human eye is parasitized with nematodes of this genus. Up to the present time only four cases of infestation of the human eye are on record, all of these reported from China.

SUMMARY OF FOUR CASES RECORDED PREVIOUSLY

Case 1.—A Chinaman, aged 25, with relatively slight symptoms, had six worms removed from the right eye. The case was reported by Stuckey.1

Case 2.—A Chinaman had severe symptoms ; he had marked ectropion of the right eye and excessive lacrimation ; he was very nearly dismissed as having incurable facial paralysis. Two worms were removed from the right eye. The case was reported by Trimble.2

Case 3.—A Canadian missionary in China, a man aged

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