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Article
July 1935

THE BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE LENS: IV. THE ORIGIN OF PIGMENT IN THE LENS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;14(1):99-107. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840070111008
Abstract

In the development of the crystalline lens, a yellowish color appears in its central or nuclear layer in late adult life. This occurs not only in the lens of human beings but in that of other animals. Vogt1 stated that the lens of a calf is uniformly colorless, while that of an old cow is yellow. Walls2 reported that the lenses of certain animals, such as squirrels, normally have a yellow color, which he concluded may be utilized as a color filter for visual purposes. Walls was able to extract a colored substance from such lenses in cold 2 per cent potassium hydrate and called this substance lentiflavine. He could not extract such a substance from brown and black cataract of human beings and considered the substance extracted by Gifford and Puntenny3 to be of a different nature. He felt that the use of heat required in

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