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Article
August 1935

SHORT STUDIES ON THE HISTORY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY: II. SIR JONATHAN HUTCHINSON, THE GREATEST "GENERALIZED SPECIALIST," AND HIS CONTRIBUTION TO OPHTHALMOLOGY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;14(2):203-228. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840080029004
Abstract

In the winter session of 1849-1850, Jonathan Hutchinson, tall, dark and quiet, "with deep set eyes which seemed to peer through and beyond his vis-a-vis," was enrolled for the lectures at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London—a man, who, by his own endeavors, before he reached his thirtieth year, was to exercise an enduring influence on the science of medicine and inspire to pursue deep investigation in clinical medicine a greater number of students than any other one man in modern times; a man destined, also, to affect ophthalmology profoundly for all time, whose personal observations, teaching and influence in that special field have been equaled perhaps only by the great von Graefe himself.

Hutchinson was born on July 23, 1828. He came of serious-minded Quaker folk in Yorkshire. He was educated by governesses at home. At 17 years of age, on Jan. 22, 1845, he was apprenticed to Caleb

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