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Article
September 1935

CERVICAL SYMPATHECTOMY IN RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA: PRELIMINARY REPORT ON RESULTS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Ophthalmology and Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;14(3):441-452. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840090127008
Abstract

Retinitis pigmentosa, starting in childhood and progressing gradually with or without stationary periods to more or less complete blindness, has not been strikingly influenced by any of the present methods of therapy. Any attempts, then, to halt the progress of the disease or ameliorate the existing disability should evoke considerable interest. In a brief report Royle, of Australia, presented five patients with retinitis pigmentosa in whom section of the sympathetic pathways to the eye was accomplished.1 Two years later he reported on fourteen patients and presented visual fields showing definite increases following sympathectomy done early. Those with blindness of long standing did not respond.2 In all these patients he used a method of section of the sympathetic trunk below the first thoracic ganglion.3

Favorable results, with increase in central and peripheral vision or improvement in night blindness, were reported by Meighen,4 Campbell

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