[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.235.143.190. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1935

PROVISIONS FOR THE SCHOOLING OF THE BLIND AND PARTIALLY BLIND

Author Affiliations

Principal of the New York Institute for the Education of the Blind NEW YORK

Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;14(3):473-480. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840090159012
Abstract

When the skilled ophthalmologist, despite his faithful use of all his powers, finds his patient losing such vision as he may have; or when the operation which had been indicated and was performed has resulted disastrously ; when blindness is imminent or has actually come, the question is always "What next?" The patient himself may ask it, and the great-hearted physician wishes he might give comfort and encouragement in the face of disaster. If the patient is an adult and a professional man, let him know that if sight is lost all is not necessarily lost, for there are many ways in which blind men and women may live happy and useful lives. To help in just such crises there have been formed such associations as the New York Association for the Blind, commonly known as the Lighthouse, the Industrial Home for Blind Men, and the Marie Bloede Workshop

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×