[Skip to Navigation]
Article
October 1935

LIGHT STIMULI OF MINIMAL MEASURED DURATION AS A MEANS OF PERIMETRY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Ophthalmology, Nervous and Mental Diseases and Experimental Surgery of the Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;14(4):541-553. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840100025002
Abstract

In a previous communication1 it was determined that for the average normal person there exists a zone between 50 and 60 degrees on the horizontal temporal meridian outside of which there is no perception for a rapid flash of light or a speed of approximately one twenty-five thousandth of a second. As was stated at that time, such determinations were found during the attempt to study a method for investigating the chronaxia of the optic nerve.

Perimetry has a long history dating from the time of Ptolemy;2 its scientific basis was laid down by von Graefe3 and Förster4 and is further elaborated in the present-day texts of Peter5 and Traquair.6 Many are the contributions to perimetry, but as yet no one has made use of the flash of a light as a test target. Presentation of this new method was received

Add or change institution
×