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Article
December 1935

Blindness and the Blind in the United States.

Author Affiliations
 

By Henry Best. Price, $6.50. Pp. 734. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1934.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;14(6):1055-1056. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840120193022

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Abstract

Best, now professor of sociology in the University of Kentucky, was formerly an instructor in several state schools for the deaf, a social worker in New York and a student of the blind. In 1914 he published a book on the deaf in the United States, and in 1919 one on blindness in the United States. The present encyclopedic work, is, he states, a revision and expansion of the earlier book on blindness, with greatly increased consideration of the prevention of blindness ; and it is published by way of celebration of the centennial of the beginning of organized work for the blind in the United States by the three oldest schools, all established at nearly the same time (1832 and 1833)—the New York Institute for the Education of the Blind, the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind and the Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the

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