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Article
January 1936

TRANSITORY CHOKED DISK: REPORT OF A CASE WITH AN ELEVEN YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(1):36-39. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840130046004

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Abstract

I first saw the patient in the pediatric clinic of the New York Post-Graduate Hospital on Jan. 14, 1924. He was then a boy of 9 years and complained of vomiting spells of increasing frequency for two months. At the time of admission to the clinic they amounted to five or six attacks daily, and the vomiting was described as a "shooting out with much force" and as being preceded by splitting frontal and vertical headache, which was markedly relieved with the onset of the vomiting. The attacks were not related to meals and often awakened the child. He often felt dizzy during these two months but never fainted. He was absent from school for a great part of the time. At no time was he feverish or affected with impairment of vision. He had a discharge from both ears in 1922, but no aural disturbance since then. His

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