[Skip to Navigation]
Article
January 1936

BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE LENS: V. CEVITAMIC ACID CONTENT OF THE BLOOD AND URINE OF SUBJECTS WITH SENILE CATARACT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(1):78-83. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840130088009
Abstract

Much interest has been aroused by the finding of vitamin C, or cevitamic acid, in the lens and aqueous by Harris,1 and by Birch and Dann.2 Its presence was confirmed by Müller and Buschke,3 Euler and Martius,4 Fischer,5 Monjukowa and Fradkin6 and Bietti.7 In addition, they found that cevitamic acid was absent or diminished in quantity in the aqueous of cataractous and aphakic eyes. According to these authors, the quantities of cevitamic acid are surprisingly large when compared with the amounts in other body tissues and fluids. The values given by Müller and Buschke for the vitamin C content of the human lens and aqueous are 30 and 12 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters, respectively. Farmer8 determined the cevitamic acid content of the normal human blood plasma to be between 1 and 2 mg. He found that the amount of reduced

Add or change institution
×