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Article
February 1936

R̂LE OF MALARIA IN CONTROL OF ATROPHY OF THE OPTIC NERVE DUE TO SYPHILIS: A STUDY OF TWELVE CASES

Author Affiliations

INDIANAPOLIS
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Indiana University School of Medicine, and the Indianapolis City Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(2):250-269. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840140100007
Abstract

The fever treatment of syphilitic diseases of the central nervous system has commanded considerable space in the medical literature during the past decade. In 1918 Wagner von Jauregg1 announced that he had intentionally inoculated patients suffering from dementia paralytica with the organism of tertian malaria and as a result of this experiment had witnessed physical and mental improvement in a certain percentage of the patients. Since then the treatment of patients suffering from dementia paralytica by induced malaria has been placed on a firm basis and is now recognized as a sound therapeutic procedure. Fever has also been induced in persons with other syphilitic conditions either by a disease produced intentionally or by some artificial method of elevating the body temperature. At the present time there is a wave of enthusiasm throughout the United States over the use of artificial or mechanical means of elevating the body temperature

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