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Article
February 1936

EPITHELIAL DOWNGROWTH INTO THE ANTERIOR CHAMBER FOLLOWING CATARACT EXTRACTION: ARREST BY RADIUM TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(2):270-282. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840140120008
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to consider the nature of downgrowth of epithelium and its clinical recognition and to point to a rational and simple plan of treatment which has proved to be successful in a few cases. Idiopathic and traumatic cysts of the iris will not be considered as pertinent to the subject, except as they may be influenced by the treatment to be discussed.

Collins and Cross, in 1892,1 reported two cases in which epithelium was found lining the anterior chamber after cataract extraction. Glaucoma occurred eight months after operation in the first case, and when the eye was removed, two years later, it showed laminated epithelium on the back of the cornea, the anterior surface of the iris, the capsule of the lens and the hyaloid membrane. Apparently this is the first case on record. The authors presented two theories regarding the mode

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