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Article
March 1936

BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE EYE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, the University of Chicago.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(3):522-543. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840150156009
Abstract

Numerous contributions have been made to the literature of ocular chemistry since the publication of "The Biochemistry of the Eye."1 It seems desirable to review this ever expanding subject from the time covered by that publication until the present time and to correlate as many of the new facts as possible.

Superficial critics have often suggested that only a few of the innumerable papers on ocular chemistry will be of permanent value, but they forget that progress is made by the cumulative effects of many workers, each adding his bit of information. Although many observations seem trivial or confirmatory, they aid in filling in the multitudinous details of the complex chemical picture of the eye.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS

The nature of one type of exophthalmos was explored by Marine and his co-workers.2 Marine2b found that methyl cyanide causes exophthalmos in normal and thyroidectomized animals. He

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