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Article
April 1936

ARTIFICIAL FEVER THERAPY IN CASES OF OCULAR SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

DAYTON, OHIO
From the Department of Ophthalmology and the Kettering Institute for Medical Research, the Miami Valley Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(4):624-644. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840160048004
Abstract

In various parts of the world syphilis is held to be responsible for from 4 to 15 per cent of cases of blindness.1 The various exhibitions of syphilis in the eye rank with those of involvement of the central nervous system in their reluctance to yield to antisyphilitic chemotherapy. The inadequacy of orthodox treatment has been repeatedly demonstrated. Crisp2 has pointed out that recurrences are common even in patients who have received chemotherapy for many years and who may have had persistently negative serologic reactions.

In 1918 Wagner-Jauregg3 introduced malaria as a treatment for dementia paralytica, and remarkable results have been obtained by its use in a disease previously regarded as practically incurable. O'Leary and Welsh4 reported excellent clinical results in approximately 40 per cent of 1,000 cases during a period of nine years. Despite the brilliant results which have been obtained with therapeutic fever

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