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Article
April 1936

TUMOR OF THE OPTIC NERVE: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(4):686-691. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840160110007
Abstract

Primary tumor of the optic nerve is rare.1 The growth may vary from a small localized thickening to a mass that fills the orbit and crowds the eye forward and literally out of the head. It is a condition essentially of early life and of slow growth, producing usually, as observed by Graefe, and exophthalmos straight forward, though sometimes with a deviation down and in.

The motility of the eye remains intact until a late period. The lids stretch as the eyeball advances and cover the cornea with a continually thinning structure. Later, when lagophthalmos and corneal ulceration have taken place, degeneration of the eyeball occurs rapidly. Hence, the earlier the growth is removed, the better the prognosis. Extension into the cerebral cavity sometimes occurs, but extension forward into the bulbus is unusual.

Ophthalmoscopically, one observes a neuritis of the postbulbar type, with venous engorgement. Later, evidences

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