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Article
May 1936

OCULAR DOMINANCE: ITS INDEPENDENCE OF RETINAL EVENTS

Author Affiliations

UNIVERSITY, VA.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(5):890-897. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840170102009
Abstract

Functional asymmetry within the visual apparatus is well illustrated by the difference in the behavior of the two eyes during binocular activity. Thus, the dominant or master eye directs its visual axis to a point in space, while its fellow, the nondominant eye, consummates the act of binocular central fixation by adjusting itself so that corresponding retinal points are stimulated. Moreover, Sheard1 has pointed out that the triangle of binocular vision is not isoceles, as many suppose, but is, in reality, a right triangle, with its right angle at the nodal point of the dominant eye. It is true that these relationships do not hold under all conditions of visual stimulation. However, indications of the differential rôle played by the two eyes are easily observed in changes in fixation involving appreciable variations in the degree of convergence, while the right triangulation is evident when the angle of convergence

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