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Article
June 1936

CYCLOPIA IN A NEW-BORN KITTEN: ANATOMIC FINDINGS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(6):998-1003. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840180042004
Abstract

The term "cyclops," derived from the Greek κυκγος + ὥψ, meaning "round-eyed," is truly appropriate to the present specimen. As can be observed in figure 1, the relatively large eyeball is located in the midline, entirely external to the underlying cranium, and is not covered by eyelids.

Seefelder in 1930 reviewed the literature and briefly described the principal facts of cyclopia.1 He stated that the condition strictly belongs to the malformations of the head, since the changes simultaneously involve the anterior part of the brain and the nose as well as the eye. Cyclopia is not an especially rare defect. Nor is it limited to man, for it occurs also in other mammals (most frequently in the pig) as well as in birds, amphibians and fishes. The anomaly particularly affects the part of the brain and of the skull lying between the two ocular anlagen and either partly or, exceptionally,

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