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Article
June 1936

CHANGES IN REFRACTION FOLLOWING OPERATION FOR STRABISMUS

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Ophthalmic Surgery, the University of Michigan.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(6):1020-1031. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840180064006
Abstract

The importance in orthoptic training and in the care of all patients with strabismus of obtaining the best possible vision is obvious and well established. The only exception is the case in which the better eye is deliberately fogged in some way in order to stimulate improvement in vision in the amblyopic eye. Except when such training is purposely carried on, every care must be taken to insure the patient's possessing at all times his maximum of visual acuity. To this end, errors of refraction are carefully corrected, and properly fitted glasses become probably the most important single factor in the treatment of strabismus. That glasses often need changing after operations on the extra-ocular muscles for strabismus has received little emphasis by recent writers. In fact, in most texts and articles dealing with changes in refraction only bare mention has been made of the possible effect that surgical intervention

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