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Article
June 1936

CONGENITAL HEAD-NODDING AND NYSTAGMUS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(6):1032-1036. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840180076007
Abstract

There are two conditions that have as their most prominent, if not only, symptoms head-nodding and nystagmus: The first is acquired head-nodding and nystagmus, or spasmus nutans. The second is congenital head-nodding and nystagmus, which may occur in several members of the same family. The differential diagnosis may be outlined as follows:

There are other conditions, such as multiple sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia and Parkinson's disease, which have among their signs and symptoms head-nodding and nystagmus, but these conditions can be differentiated by their associated general and neurologic manifestations.

REPORT OF CASE

History.—P. M., a boy aged 8, was brought to the clinic of Dr. Francis Heed Adler at the Wills Hospital, Philadelphia, in November 1934. His mother said she wanted something done to make his head and eyes stop shaking.

The patient had been born at full term and was normally delivered. Shortly after his

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